5 Homes Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright

It is a testament to the prescience and inherent genius of American architect Frank Lloyd Wright that only about half of his designs were realized—the rest of us just couldn’t keep up. In a career spanning seven decades, Wright designed 1,114 works of which only 532 came to fruition, but that half-told history was more than enough to inspire the generations of architects and designers that followed. Like Wright, the designers of these modern marvels have embraced change, building new contemporary masterpieces that allow their inhabitants to live as Wright intended;

We are all here to develop a life more beautiful, more concordant, more fully expressive of our own sense of pride and joy than ever before in the world.

These listings take cues from one of the greatest architects in history.

Vito Dumas, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Vivi Reissis Etchegoin– Ginevra Sotheby’s International Realty

Step into an inviting contemporary interior inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Fallingwater house. Designed and built in 1963, this property is a work of art in its own right. Walnut trees and lianas line the property, while four floors—connected through an interior lift—work with the slope of the surrounding ravine. Patio-style dining, exposed brick interiors, and nods to Bauhaus in every direction make this residence a design dream.

Jupiter, Florida, United States

 Doc Ellingson– ONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Additional Fallingwater inspiration can be found in this South Florida home. The pairing of considered exterior landscaping with an overall dedication to natural materials harkens back to Wright’s love of organic architecture. Warm wood softens the sharp angles that give this 2015 build a decidedly current feel, while the interiors offer all the expected amenities plus a two-story master enclave that features two private patios, an office, hot tub, and, in true Floridian fashion, a putting green.

Telluride, Colorado, United States 

Bill Fandel– Telluride Sotheby’s International Realty

Tiered roofing, sprawling outdoor space, and a remarkable mountain setting create spectacular allure on a small corner of this 35-acre site. Natural finishings catch the spotlight in this Telluride home, including custom-quarried marble from Italy, limestone from India, and rock sourced from the surrounding area. Through crystalline glass windows, elegant fittings and top-of-the-line materials sing throughout each room, which comprise six bedrooms, indoor and outdoor home spas, a theater room, wine room, fitness center, and chef-approved kitchen.

Prague, Czech Republic 

Czech Republic Sotheby’s International Realty

The stacked exterior form of this Hanspaulka gem definitely hits Wright’s notion of organic-meets-functionalist architecture. Aptly named Vila Vista, this home’s five floors angle out over beautiful park gardens, views of Prague Castle, and the city skyline. Inside, the 1,500-square-meter, open-concept design is so well done that everything from the six bedrooms to the home cinema and catering kitchen feels completely connected.

Scottsdale, Arizona, United States

Debbie Negrin Will Foote – Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty

Wright’s trademark angles get a desert spin in this Scottsdale home, where the lavish outdoor living spaces are as inviting as the interior. Inside, doorways and windows frame the natural landscape at every turn, and dry stack stone walls mirror the region’s naturally-occurring rock formations. There is plenty for the eye to play with here, including views of Pinnacle Peak from the relaxing heated pool.

As Wright once said, “The mission of an architect is to help people understand how to make life more beautiful, the world a better one for living in, and to give reason, rhyme, and meaning to life.”

Certainly, these inspired designs do just that.

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How Art Staging Can Impact the Sale of Your Home

There is a perception paradox that sometimes exists within real estate: the idea that an empty minimalist home offers a blank slate for potential buyers to imagine their perfect home. While a small slice of the general population may have the unique vision to picture a space with cascading light features, warm and inviting furniture arrangements, or eye-catching objets d’art, the majority of buyers look to experts in interior design for help. The truth is, the benefits of staging your home are extensive. Properly staged homes spend substantially less time on the market, routinely sell for more money, and frequently end up on must-see lists.

Now, how-to-stage-your-home lists are plenty, with most touching on curb appeal, making the most of challenging spaces, and striking that perfect balance between clean and lived-in, not to mention an emphasis on neutral, approachable décor. But, not all will mention the unparalleled impact of adding artwork—a fairly crucial element to a staging environment, since it can cue subconscious feelings and connections in buyers and create emotional attachment to your space. Here’s how to use art staging to create allure and further impact the sale of your home.

Know Your Audience

New York City, New York | Nikki Field – Sotheby’s International Realty – East Side Manhattan Brokerage

This may not be the time to hang up a politically-charged Basquiat or that powerful original Mapplethorpe. While it’s true that you never know someone’s particular tastes, erring on the side of caution is wise. Steer away from family photographs and images of people, leaning instead to abstract work, nature images and landscapes, and interpretive silhouettes or figurative renderings to appeal to a wider set of buyers.

Work With the Architecture

Corte Madera, California | Danielle Chavanon & Isobel Wiener – Sotheby’s International Realty – San Francisco Brokerage

Many homeowners have a tendency to hang art too high, which can mean people pass right by the work. The point is to have buyers pause in your space, and to do that, they need to have a direct eye line to it. Follow the unspoken gallery rule of matching the center lines of your artwork if you have pieces close together. Most galleries will hang bigger works with ample space around them at 58-or-so inches off the ground. Use beaming, feature paint walls, and any kind of architectural framing as prime space for your artwork.

Complement the Décor

Emirates Hills, Dubai | Leigh Williamson – Gulf Sotheby’s International Realty

Consider the mood for each room—is it a relaxed and inviting sitting area? A studious and productive study? A bright and buzzing kitchen? Color plays a very important role in home staging, with neutrals ruling in most cases, but don’t hesitate to mirror the punches of color found around your rooms in pillows or accessories.

Allow the Eye to Travel

Cape Town, South Africa | Brendan Miller – Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty

How do you want buyers to feel leaving your home? While they will of course be evaluating many aspects of the property, it’s likely that your home may have extra appeal for a particular subset of buyers. Have a fantastic wine cellar to show off? An abstract work with a spiraling stroke pointing to it will let the eye bounce into the next beautiful space. Outdoor infinity pool a big draw? Complement its tone with pale blue washes on the walls in surrounding rooms or with striking outdoor sculptures.

Many buyers may not consider the art outright when viewing a home — after all, it doesn’t come with it as part of the sale — but creating a mood and feeling of positivity, relaxation, and an overall inviting mood will stay with them far longer than they realize, and likely result in less selling time and more offers coming through your door.

Top Photo: Nikki Field & Patricia A Wheatley – Sotheby’s International Realty – East Side Manhattan Brokerage

Learn more about how Sotheby’s International Realty can help you market your home

Posted on April 3, 2018

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